Theme: Civil society and peacebuilding

Civil society stands by assaulted colleague

Serbia Kosovo joint statement

This statement was drafted by participants in the Kosovo-Serbia Rapid Response Mechanism, comprised of CSOs committed to reacting to any instances of divisive rhetoric or destabilising incidents which can negatively affect relations between communities and harm the environment for the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue.

By sharing perspectives on specific issues, the mechanism helps deepen understanding about the sources of grievance within particularly communities and reduces the scope for a lack of awareness or misinformation. This process is facilitated by Peaceful Change initiative as part of the UK-government funded ALVED (Amplifying Local Voices for Equitable Development) project.

Civil society organisations from Kosovo and Serbia have expressed their support for Miodrag Milićević from NGO Aktiv, who was verbally and physically assaulted by a member of Kosovo Police special units in the vicinity of the Jarinje crossing in north Kosovo.

On 14th November, Miodrag Milićević from NGO Aktiv was verbally and physically assaulted by a member of Kosovo Police special units in the vicinity of the Jarinje crossing in north Kosovo. The assault both reflects and contributes to the deteriorating atmosphere for trust and peaceful coexistence in Kosovo which has been observable in recent months and has reached an alarming scale of escalation with the withdrawal of Serb representatives from Kosovo institutions.

Recent actions by key parties contributing to this escalation have been taken without due consideration to long-term consequences and the damage that can be done to the underlying framework for normalisation. Continuing an environment of threats, intimidation, humiliation, and mistrust will only exacerbate an already fragile situation.

Our organisations have committed to improving the conditions for normalisation by creating channels between communities and building trust to contribute to a long-term and sustainable peace. At this time, we call on all stakeholders for peace in the region to refrain from escalatory language and to use relations, platforms and channels that cross community lines and political lines to create engagement, build understanding of the multiple perspectives on the present context, and contribute to an environment in which key actors take well-considered actions that have in view the well-being of all communities.

We also call on the international community to demonstrate an appropriate urgency in their engagement with the present crisis. We stand with our colleague, Mr. Milićević, and call on the incident to be addressed in line with the relevant legal frameworks in place.

Signatories:
  1. Aktiv
  2. Belgrade Center for Security Policy (BCSP)
  3. Community Building Mitrovica (CBM)
  4. Center for Peace and Tolerance (CPT)
  5. Civic Initiatives, Serbia
  6. European Movement in Serbia (EMiS)
  7. Forum for Development and Multiethnic Collaboration (FDMC)
  8. Foundation BFPE for a Responsible Society (BFPE)
  9. Humanitarian Law Center Kosovo
  10. Institute for Territorial Economic Development – InTER
  11. Jelena Lončar, University of Belgrade
  12. Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (YUCOM)
  13. Local Peace
  14. Media Center Caglavica
  15. Mitrovica Women Association for Human Rights
  16. New Social Initiative (NSI)
  17. NGO Be Active 16, Presevo
  18. Portali LUGINALAJM, Bujanovac
  19. Radio Gorazdevac
  20. Radio Astra, Prizren
  21. Rahim Salihi, civil society activist, Bujanovac
  22. Youth Initiative for Human Rights – Kosovo
  23. Youth Initiative for Human Rights – Serbia
  24. Valon Arifi, Civic Activist
  25. Voice of Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians in Kosovo (VoRAE)
  26. Vjollca Krasniqi, University of Prishtina

The PCi Report: ‘Unpacking the Impact of Conflict Economy Dynamics on Six Libyan Municipalities’ includes Policy Recommendations to Mitigate the Impact of the Conflict Economy in Libya

Peaceful Change initiative’s (PCi) new report, ‘Unpacking the Impact of Conflict Economy Dynamics on Six Libyan Municipalities’ fills an important gap in our understanding of conflict dynamics in Libya, arguing that political elites and armed groups cannot be assessed in a vacuum, without exploration of the socio-economic context of the communities that they claim to represent. The research takes a localised approach, exploring factors that influence local conflict economy dynamics, which vary from area to area. It is also a human centred approach, viewing Libyans as participants in the local conflict economy – both willing and unwilling – rather than only as passive victims of the conflict-affected environment in which they live.

The report concludes that reducing the societal impact of Libya’s conflict economy cannot rely solely on high level elite bargains – and a top-down approach to security sector reform. National level conflict dynamics and local instability are linked and this must be tackled via a twin track approach whereby local interventions are supported by the implementation of national-level reforms that address structural issues. In addition, in support of local social cohesion, the paper recommends the establishment of economic-social peace partnerships that promote pro-peace business activities across conflict divides. It also recommends conflict sensitive livelihood and peacebuilding interventions that minimise the risk of assistance worsening conflict dynamics, and that maximise opportunities to contribute to sustainable peace.

On Civil Society in Serbia and Kosovo

Peaceful Change initiative is pleased to announce the launch of research into cross-community initiatives in Kosovo and Serbia, undertaken jointly by the Universities of Pristina and Belgrade as part of the Amplifying Local Voices for Equitable Development (ALVED) project, supported by the UK government.

Click on the link to download the report: The Landscape of Cross-Community Initiatives in Kosovo and South Serbia

Citizens must not be held hostage by the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue

A diverse group of 40 civil society organisations, activists, and media outlets from Kosovo and Serbia express their profound concern about the impact of a lack of progress in the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue on local communities.

Given the recent EU reports and developments on the ground, we the undersigned are concerned about the impact of a lack of progress in the Belgrade-Pristina dialogue on local communities in Serbia and Kosovo. It is people on the ground who suffer most from the persistence of tensions and mistrust. All sides must therefore desist from inflammatory rhetoric that harms and damages relations within and between communities. The scope for ambiguities must be reduced through transparency and accountability. All citizens must be clear about what has been agreed to, whilst the process of dialogue itself must be brought closer to the very citizens affected by it.  

The scenes of the Serbian Ortodox Church’s Patriarch Porfirije being greeted on the streets of Prizren send a positive message of mutual respect and peaceful coexistence; images and sentiments that provide hope for the future of relations within and between Serbia and Kosovo. We commend all parties for their constructive approach – in particular, Gazmend Muhaxheri, the mayor of Peja/Peć, who attended the proceedings – and hope that these foundations can be built upon. 

However, we also call for tangible progress on a number of other fronts. In Kosovo, there is a fundamental lack of dialogue and cooperation through elected institutions. Srpska Lista parliamentarians are failing to represent the needs of the Kosovo Serb community. The continued absence of their MPs from the Kosovo Assembly means that their constituents and the daily problems they face are not effectively voiced. We call for Srpska Lista’s immediate return and active participation.

Many agreements are barely mentioned today. The main bridge in Mitrovica remains closed to traffic, despite extensive EU investment. Both parties should engage to resolve the demarcation of Mitrovica North, which has hampered the reopening process. Additional steps must be taken to ensure the Bridge serves as an inclusive and shared space that connects people from both sides of the river Ibar.

With respect to the issue of licence plates, all parties should work constructively to find a solution that will not harm people on the ground. The new crossing points agreed to previously should be opened forthwith to make it easier for citizens to travel without unnecessary distance and delay. The free flow of people should be a fundamental part of the normalisation of relations.

The mutual recognition of diplomas has stalled, leading to shortages of vital staff in key public institutions in south Serbia and in Kosovo, for instance, including those pertaining to health, education, justice, and access to services more broadly. It is the most profound example of the consequences of a lack of implementation of what has been agreed to, and should be addressed without further delay.

In south Serbia, there is a sense that the integration of the Albanian community is being damaged by the strained relations between Belgrade and Pristina. The seven-point plan for integration should be a priority for the new Serbian government, including the inclusion of Albanian representatives in its Coordination Body for the Municipalities of Preshevë/Presevo, Bujanovc/Bujanovac and Medvegjë/Medvedja. Concerns pertaining to the conduct of the census in Medvegjë/Medvedja should be addressed immediately, and there should be a thorough review of the passivation process.

We, the undersigned, fully support any process that can bring new momentum and positive energy, and which can benefit citizens from all walks of life. Building trust and confidence is vital for future relations within and between communities.

Signatories

  1. AKTIV
  2. Advocacy Center for Democratic Culture (ACDC)
  3. Association for Heritage and Cultural Creativity Presevo
  4. Balkan Forum
  5. Belgrade Centre for Security Policy (BCSP)
  6. Centre for Peace and Tolerance (CPT)
  7. Civic initiative (Gradjanske inicijative)
  8. Community Building Mitrovica (CBM)
  9. Centar for Democracy and Education – Valley
  10. European Center for Minority Issues Kosovo (ECMI)
  11. European Movement in Serbia (EMIS)
  12. European Fund for the Balkans (EFB)
  13. Foundation BFPE for a Responsible Society (BFPE)
  14. Gorazdevac Media Group
  15. Human Center Mitrovica
  16. Jelena Lončar, Academic, University of Belgrade
  17. Junior Chamber International Prizren (JCI- Prizren)
  18. Kosovar Center for Security Studies (KCSS)
  19. Kosovar Gender Studies Center
  20. Kosova Info
  21. Lawyers’ Committee for Human Rights (YUCOM)
  22. Mitrovica Women Association for Human Rights
  23. Ministria e Lajmeve Presevo
  24. Media Center Caglavica
  25. NGO Budi Aktivan 16 Presevo
  26. NGO Integra
  27. Peer Educators Network (PEN)
  28. Professor Vjollca Krasniqi, University of Pristina
  29. Pozitiv 365 Presevo
  30. Rahim Salihi, civil society activist, Bujanovac
  31. Radio Astra Prizren
  32. Radio Peja/Pec
  33. Sbunker
  34. TV Prizreni
  35. The Future Bujanovac
  36. Valon Arifi, civil society activist
  37. Voice of Roma, Ashkali and Egyptians (VoRAE)
  38. Youth Initiative for Human Rights – Kosovo
  39. Youth Initiative for Human Rights – Serbia
  40. Youth Trails Presevo
  41. NGO Livrit Presevo
  42. Humanitarian Law Centre Kosovo
  43. New Perspektiva

Dear Journalists, Editors, Journalism Students and Writing Enthusiasts,

We are inviting you to write your story on a slice of life that depicts a reality, be that positive or a challenge, from the prism of multiethnicity in Kosovo and Serbia. The Media Award accepts applications until December 31st, 2022, which means there is three months’ time to research and write a story that shows how different nationalities coexist in Serbia or Kosovo.

For the year 2022, PCi has doubled the first prize in both categories (audio-visual and written format) to € 2,000 Euro and looks forward to receiving your entries.

Should you have a story that was written in the past, anytime during the period between 1st of January 2022 and the 31st of December 2022, you are eligible for the Media Award 2.

One of the main criteria for eligibility is that these stories must be written in Albanian or Serbian language and must have been published on or before 31st of December 2022 (earliest date of publication must be: 1st of January 2022).

For additional information about the Media Award criteria, please refer to the documents below. The Call for Application is available in English, Serbian and Albanian language.

Applications are received online through the Google Form link below: https://forms.gle/SHBtT7pVmm2unyZd8

Should you have any questions, please reach out to us via email at: media.award@peacefulchange.org.

Good luck!

The Peaceful Change initiative (PCi) Team

Call for cessation of military action on the territory of Armenia

Azerbaijan’s military action against settlements on Armenia’s sovereign territory violates international law and cannot be justified by any of Azerbaijan’s declared statements on provocations, the mining of Azerbaijani’s territory, or ongoing frustrations at the pace of implementation of the 2020 ceasefire agreement. We appeal for an immediate cessation of military action for the protection of civilians and a return to ongoing dialogue formats.

PCi’s peacebuilders and our partners have long-standing relations with civic and political actors in both Armenia and Azerbaijan and have a profound respect for those who have been committed to a peaceful transformation around the parameters of the conflict between the two countries. We have deep empathy with the people of Azerbaijan who experienced considerable suffering and acknowledge outstanding grievances from previous wars between Armenia and Azerbaijan. We are convinced, however, that a military or force-based resolution to the present situation can only cause harm to the neighbourly relations without which a lasting peace is impossible.

We call on civil society and independent actors in both Armenia and Azerbaijan to act in line with principles that look ahead to peaceful relations between the two countries by withholding from rhetoric that supports or justifies military action, by not posting information that has not been verified, and by using ties that have been built over years of working for peace to in the region to verify facts, understand perspectives, and provide moral support to one another.

Youth Participation in Decision-Making and Peacebuilding in Armenia

Armenia today represents a vivid example both of new opportunities and challenges that the youth are facing. This is partly evidenced by the fact that 88% of young men and women (18-29 years of age) view the 2018 change of government in Armenia positively. At the same time, issues including unemployment, poverty, housing as well as other challenges in the socio-economic sphere carry their own particular impacts on youth resulting in a large number of young people leaving the country, either for permanent emigration or seasonal guest worker jobs. This report synthesises findings and analysis of research into the participation of youth in decision making and peacebuilding in Armenia in the context of the political changes since April 2018.

The Report (produced in Yerevan 2019,) has been produced as part of “Progressing Youth Participation in Armenia on Governance and Peace” project.

To click on the report in English, click here

To click on the report in Armenian, click here

ILO launches new guide to promote social cohesion and peaceful coexistence in fragile contexts

PCi’s trustee Joan McGregor and Senior Peacebuilding Advisor Raj Bhari have been working with ILO to produce a new guide:  Promoting Social Cohesion and Peaceful Coexistence in Fragile Contexts through Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). 

The guide is now available to download here: Promoting Social Cohesion and Peaceful Coexistence in Fragile Contexts through TVET.

The guide is aimed at TVET practitioners to consolidate their role as active promoters of social cohesion and peaceful co-existence.

The guide seeks to strengthen the role of skills development policies and programmes in peacebuilding efforts through inclusive learning methodologies and training in relevant core skills. 

It also provides practical guidance on how to adapt training, to mixed community groups, embed conflict resolution skills, cooperation, and other relevant core skills into training curricula, and create conflict sensitive, inclusive, and diverse learning environments for all.

The guide will be launched at a Webinar on International Day of Living Together in Peace on May 17 2021 at 2pm UK time. To participate in the Webinar, please click on the following link:  https://ilo-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_jr1K9WatS4yB2qDJRILlpg

Supporting marginalised communities in Georgia impacted by COVID-19

This report has been produced by PCi’s partner organisation in Georgia, IDP Women’s Association Consent. The report summarises quantitative and qualitative research carried out by Consent and their partners in isolated communities in three regions of Georgia, Mtskheta-Mtianeti, Shida Kartli, and Samegrelo, on the way they were impacted by the first and second waves of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While COVID-19 has had a wide and profound impact on communities all over the world, it has been especially devastating to marginalised communities that are harder to reach by government assistance and may have fewer resources to cope with unforeseen shocks to the system.

The research, conducted in October and November 2020 looked to understand how these communities were impacted by the first waves of COVID-19, with a view to understanding the structures that support community resilience and the copy mechanisms that can be applied. The report offers recommendations to the international community providing assistance to Georgia, to the Georgian government and to Georgian civil society.

The research was conducted with the support of the UK Government’s Conflict, Stability and Security Fund.

For the report in English, click here. For the report in Georgian, click here.

Understanding divisive narratives in Serbia and Kosovo

Peaceful Change initiative is pleased to present research undertaken by Ipsos in order to understand how divisive narratives are generated and disseminated in mainstream media in Serbia and Kosovo. The research is available here: Understanding divisive narratives qualitative research – online focus groups

The findings and recommendations of this research Understanding divisive narratives – media analysis will be used to guide a number of Media Consultation Dialogues (MCD), which will engage media professionals from a variety of backgrounds in order to discuss ways and means of ensuring that divisive narratives become less prominent in mainstream discourse.

This research has been commissioned in the framework of a two and a half year project ‘Amplifying Local Voices for Equitable Development’; funded from the UK Government’s Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF).